Breads and Crackers

Two Crumpet Recipes

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"And tho' there's no tea-supping and eating crumpet – it's a fine life!"  – (from the musical Oliver!)

I knew the word long before I knew the food.  English muffins were not an uncommon thing, but I don't really remember having crumpets at all as a child.  And when I bought them in the store one time, the just looked, well, weird.  Holes on one side…do you slice it in half, like an English muffin?  No…you just toast them and butter them and eat them.  Oh, okay.  And they were good.  And that was that.  Years ago.

Much more recently, Jen of Alien Spouse asked me if I'd ever tried making crumpets.

Hm!

Well, no, I hadn't.  But I knew right then that I would be doing so in the very near future.

I had a lovely morning of baking this past Sunday – two different batches of crumpets (from two different recipes) and the Fluted Polenta and Ricotta Cake for this week's Tuesdays With Dorie post.  So much fun. 

Why two different batches of crumpets?  Oh, because I'm just silly that way.  Having never made them, I really didn't have one I could vouch for, and instead of just trying one, and maybe not liking it, and then wondering if it was the recipe or just me, I figured if I tried two of them, then I'd really KNOW.  If that makes any sense.

I pulled recipes from two books – cookbooks that had sat on my mother's mother's bookshelves when she was alive, and had moved to my mom's shelves, and now reside on mine, since my mother downsized.  Recipes are marked with narrow strips of paper or thin cardboard; words written in my grandmother's hand – "Pease Pudding" and "Rock Cakes" and so on….

First version comes from the book Great British Cooking: A Well-Kept Secret by Jane Garmey, originally published in hardcover in 1984, and in paperback in 1992. 

Ingredients:

2  1/2 cups flour

2/3 cup water

1/4 oz active dry yeast (1 pkg)

1 tsp sugar

salt

2 T oil

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Note – In order to make crumpets you will need 3 or 4 circular cookie cutters.  If you don't own any, a good substitute would be to remove both ends from an empty can that is approximately 3 inches wide and 2 inches deep.  (I used 4 cookie cutters ranging from around 3  1/4 to 4" in diameter.)

Sift the flour into a bowl and stand it on top of the stove. 

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Heat the water in a saucepan over low heat until it is lukewarm.  (I just used lukewarm water from the tap.)    Take out 3 T of water and mix with the yeast and sugar in a cup.

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Make a well in the flour and pour in first the yeast mixture and then the remaining water and a pinch of salt. 

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Beat hard for 3 minutes, cover the bowl and stand it in a warm place

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until the dough is well risen.  (This should take about 45 minutes.)

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Beat the dough down and add a little warm water to turn the dough to a batter consistency.

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(Eventually, I added a real lot of water in order to get it to what I considered a batter consistency.  And just so you know (if you don't already) it's not easy to incorporate water into a yeast dough.  The yeast dough behaves like a junior high school clique and it's really hard for the outsider (the water) to become a real member of the group.  It can be done – it just takes determination.)

Grease a pancake giddle or a large frying pan with a little of the oil.  Place the cookie cutters on the griddle or frying pan and when the oil is hot, pour in enough dough to reach about 3/4 inch high.

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(It's me again.  At this point in my crumpet-making, the batter was still on the thick and doughy side.  It was too thick to cook properly (in my opinion) and it also cooked up too big, as you will see.)

Cook them for a few minutes until the bottoms are brown, the tops have become solid and holes have appeared all over the surface.  (If your batter isn't thinned enough, you won't get the holes like you're supposed to.  You'll get some around the edges, but not all through like you should.)

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(I saw those holes and was all excited.  But my excitement was premature, as the holes never appeared in the center area – just around the edges.)

(If the batter is too thick this will not happen and you should add more water to it.) (Yes.  I can vouch for that.)

Remove the rings,

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turn the crumpets (crumpets?  They look more like English Muffins to my silly American eyes.)

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and cook them for about 2 more minutes before removing them from the heat and draining on a paper towel. 

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(See what I mean?  Um…London, we have a problem.  These look like damn good English muffins.  Thomas would be proud.  But they ain't crumpets.  See how the tops browned like that?  And flattened?  That's not what they're supposed to look like.  There should still be visible holes that run all the way to the other side and stop there only because that was where the batter first hit the pan.)

Repeat this process until you have used up all the dough.

(I didn't repeat the process EXACTLY.  Like I said, I finally thinned the batter so that it really was a batter and not just a loose dough…and I used less of it in the rings…but even when I got more holes appearing on top, they still flattened out when I flipped them over.  Finally, with the last two rings, I just didn't flip them at all.  Because I was irritated, and I wanted there to be crumpet holes!)

Anyway, here's the whole batch.

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They still look like English muffins to me, except for the pale half-cooked two on top there.

We sampled them, and, as I expected, they were rather disappointing.  But I believe some of that had more to do with my inexperience in making them than it did with the recipe.

Here's one of the English Muffins crumpets, after I split it open with a fork.

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Okay, yeah, we've got some nooks and crannies, all right.  But that wasn't the plan.  And look at all the gummy dougy part that just stuck to the fork.  I realize it's not been toasted yet, but still.

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It's still not all that appealing, is it?

Toast the crumpets and serve with lots of butter.

Makes 12-15.  (I got 10, but I was using some larger cutters, too.)

I even took a "pretty" shot of a toasted one (one of the thinner ones), just…well…because.

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(Okay, and we don't have a toaster at the moment, so I've been using the oven as a sort of palatial toaster when needed.  It works just fine.  But this batch of crumpets did NOT.  Look how blah and gummy they are inside.  Well, if you can't tell, trust me – they were.  Even my daughter, who loves bread products more than she loves her pink sparkly shoes, handed her half of the greasy blob back to me and shook her head with a look of polite disgust.  "I don't like it." 

~~~~~

Okay, so…next batch.  At least I've learned a bit about how the consistency of the batter is supposed to be, right?  Maybe I'll have better luck with these next ones.

The next recipe comes from A Taste of London: World Famous Recipes With Nostalgic Photographs by Theodora Fitzgibbon.  It was published in 1975 and appears to have gone out of print.

Ingredients:

1 lb (4 cups) plain flour

1 tsp salt

1 tsp sugar

1 pint (2 cups) warm milk

1 heaped teaspoon dried yeast

2 tsp warm water

1/4 tsp bicarbonate of soda

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Sift the flour into a basin and add the salt. 

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Heat the milk until tepid then dissolve the sugar in half of it, and sprinkle the yeast on top.  (Do not make the milk too warm for you will kill the yeast.) 

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Leave for 10 minutes or until it froths up, then add to the centre of the flour with the rest of the warm milk and beat very well for 5 or 10 minutes. 

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Cover and leave to rise in a warm place.  Img_0985

(The book doesn't say how long to leave it, or how much you want the dough to rise, so I just go by the usual bread-making "until doubled in bulk" rule of thumb.)

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Dissolve the bicarbonate of soda in the warm water

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and add to the risen dough, then leave, covered, to rise again.  (Sorry – no photo of that second rising.  It looked a lot like the first one.)

If you have 3-4 inch plain rings (as discussed earlier, I used cookie cutters ranging in size from 3  1/4 to 4 inches in diameter), then lightly grease them, also a griddle, or a heavy frying pan, and heat them up as you would for pancakes or drop scones. 

(Pancakes are the key here, at least they were to my brain at the time.  I know about pancakes.  I know about how the bubbles create holes all over the upper surface of the pancake while it's on the griddle, and so this kind of switched on a lightbulb in my head.  Not just the fact that crumpets are supposed to have holes like that, but also – what it means in terms of the cooking status of your food.  You want to cook these pretty much all the way through on the first side, and just kind of finish them off, color-wise, on the other.  The thinness of the batter is key – I had to add a fair amount of water to the dough/batter after that second rise to get it to the right consistency), and associating it with pancake batter helps, mentally.  At least it helps me.)

Put the rings, if using them on to the hot griddle or pan, and drop tablespoonfuls of the mixture into them or into the pan. 

(Okay, here we go again.  I did that…)

(And here are the first bubbles forming around the edges…and I didn't fill them as full this time, either.)

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(And now we've got some bubbles in the middle…)

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Let it cook until the top is set and full of holes, and the bottom a pale biscuit colour. 

(Bingo!)

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(Isn't that lovely?  Look at the CRATERS!  And within them – more little holes!  Yay!  And – I know it's hard to tell in this shot, but if you look at the edge on the lower right, the color is more yellow than white.  This is where the surface has dried during this initial phase of cooking.  Most of the top is still white, but just let it sit there a little longer, and eventually the whole top of the crumpet will look kind of dry and off-white.  THAT is what you're looking for.)

Remove the rings, if using, turn the crumpets over and let them dry out for 2 minutes on the other side. 

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Regulate the heat, especially if using electricity, so that the giddle does not become too hot and burn.  (What I ended up doing, once I got the hang of the whole thing, was to lower the heat on the back burner use that half of the griddle for the finishing off.  I kept the front burner at a higher heat (it's also the "power burner" on my stove) to do the initial cooking.  That worked out nicely.)

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Remove the crumpets with a cloth, and let them cool on a rack.  When serving, toast them lightly on both sides and serve with butter on the top side (with the holes).

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Makes about 12.  (I think, by some strange quirk of fate, that I ended up with more than that.  Hard to say – these were so much better, we all ate a bunch before I could count them.  These – when toasted – were crisp on the outside, and slightly chewy inside, and deliciously buttery throughout.)

~~~~~

Okay then!  That was actually a lot of fun for me – no, really.  I like to compare recipes, for one.

(True story – years ago, some friends of my parents had a bumper crop of zucchini.  I said I'd make zucchini bread.  I'd never make zucchini bread before, so I didn't know which recipe to use.  I looked through all my cookbooks (no internet way back then) and found, if I remember right, 17 recipes.  Yes.  SEVENTEEN.  So I figured out how much flour and sugar and zucchini and whatever else I'd need to make one batch (which, in some cases, actually meant two or three loaves) from each recipe.  I ended up with twenty-something loaves of zucchini bread.  Gave some away.  Froze some.  Tried them all.  I have no idea, now, which recipe was the best.  Or which cookbook it might have come from.  And I don't care.  It was just a lot of fun – that insane marathon of zucchini bread baking.)

And, while I think the yuck factor in the first batch was MOSTLY my doing, I also think that, even if I'd done it all correctly, I'd still like the flavor of the second batch better.  Maybe it was the milk in the dough.  Or the fact that the first one only called for a pinch of salt and the second one had a whole teaspoon.  Granted, the second batch had nearly twice as much flour and would need more flour, but, using that logic, the first batch should have had at least half a teaspoon of salt – not just a little pinch. 

And so, if I were to recommend one version, it would be the recipe from A Taste of London.

And – if you are toying with the idea of making them at home, I say – DO IT!  It's fun. They're yummy.  Look on the whole thing as an adventure.  One well worth the journey.

Especially slathered in butter.  With a nice, hot cup of tea.  Served on some of your great-grandmother's (if I remember that correctly) inexpensive china with the pretty pansy faces.

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It's a fine, fine life.

34 thoughts on “Two Crumpet Recipes

  1. Okay, now it’s official. You are my kitchen super hero. YOU MADE CRUMPETS? I thought they grew in hedgerows in England or something. PEOPLE CAN MAKE THEM? I used to able to find them occasionally in the local supermarkets, but its been years. Its not as though there are restaurants on every corner where you can order them. I thought I’d actually have to go to England to get crumpets. Sure, you posted the recipe complete with pictures………but that doesn’t mean non-super-hero’s can do it. I am in awe.

  2. Jayne! You are a star! Thank You!
    Those look delicious, I’m clearly going to have to try this out now you’ve blazed the trail.

    So that’s one of my homesick cravings down. Now all I have to do is get M&S and John Lewis to deliver internationally, and I’m all set.

  3. You know what you have to try to make next, to go with these? Clotted cream. It’s divine, but no one hardly ever makes it anymore, even in London. At least not the soft fresh stuff.

  4. I just made them using Rose Levy Berenbaum’s recipe I found here:
    http://bakingblondie7.blogspot.com/2008/05/crumpets.html
    They turned out really well but I too felt that the batter could have been a little thinner like the one for dosa/pancakes. I made it because I know Bertie Wooster liked them, but I did not find anything special about them. The kids liked them and we are having it for tea after re-toasting. Will post it tomorrow or day after. Your crumpets on the header look very good.

  5. Now if we could just find Warburton’s toastie bread and a good curry sauce recipe to go with the cheese and onion pastie and the Harry Ramsdens chips life would be perfect! Oh anyone know how to make dandelion and Burdock?

  6. I laughed, I almost cried. I decided to make crumpets because the ones I buy at Byerly’s are fabulous, but a bit out of the way. I have THE EXACT same experience that you did with your first batch…except I hit a lot more bumps along the way. I too decided that I may try two batches to start with…I also had two recipes, but started with two batches of the same one. I had Chappati flour, you know, whole wheat flour, I thought I’d make chappaties one day and it never happened. I actually toasted the flour a little to give the crumpet a bit more flavour. Anyway, I do think my yeast is closer to dying than it is to being on its prime. Both All-purpose flour and WW flour looked EXACTLY like your first picture of the finished mixed ingredients. Yes, I also tried adding a LOT more water…same clique in my kitchen. I also had that “batter” consistency in my head, and I’m a killer pancake maker. Furthermore, I had visions of my storebought, imported crumpets, just like I used to eat in Canada.
    Sadly, my first batch looked just like English Muffins as well. I mean, I could lie to the hubby and tell him I made English Muffins, but his father is British and he would know I wasn’t telling the truth:)

    So, I was being SO smart I decided to *help* proof the batter in my microwave at 10% power. Well, the first proof was OK with the WW flour batch…however, the second bowl went in a batter (I panicked and stopped it at 2 minutes because it just felt wrong) and came out almost a gigantic muffin. I had inadvertently set it to full power:( Needless to say, I saw bubbles alright…only the center was uncooked.

    So, I improvised. I managed to scoop out three crumpets from the better batter…WW Flour on its own is quite foul. Sadness all around.

    I decided not to give up and give the WW batch a good chance to fulfill their destiny as crumpets. So I fried them all. In light of this more terrific failure I go back to the internet, my trusty friend. I found out that Alton Brown has his own set of videos on youtube…one featuring a fantastic English Muffin. Woe is me! If only I were on a muffin quest.

    So, Alton Brown in my head I think “what could make these babies light and fluffy and perfect. I come up with egg and cake flour.

    In pancakes one mixes the ingredients so as not to develop the gluten, but the all purpose flour does indeed seem too doughy and heavy.

    In my heart of hearts, I am secretly wishing for Alton to decipher the secret to making the perfect crumpets so I can follow his lead.

    In the meantime, I am going to continue to try until I come to the perfect recipe.

    No worries, your second recipe will be tested tomorrow:) I will buy new yeast too.

    BTW, fun blog!I too love to take pictures, but no one ever loaned me a camera when I was a little kid. Must remember to do that with my own two boys.

    Keep up the good work and I just want to express how grateful I am for your post!

    Thank you!

  7. I forgot to add that we eat crumpets with a bit of “good” butter and drizzled honey on top. Just heavenly!

  8. LourdesB – Oh my god, what a time of it you had!! I’m planning to make crumpets again some time soon – with the second recipe – and I’m also going to attempt to make clotted cream, just to be very proper about it all.

    Thank you SO much for sharing your entire experience with me – it gave me a great laugh this morning! Let me know how you make out with the other recipe, okay?

    Thanks for stopping by!

  9. Well, the poor creatures just sat there on the counter overnight. I guess I was secretly setting them up to becomes inedible…no such luck, they are still moist. My husband was getting in the shower this morning and commented that BOY was he looking forward to having great coffe and CRUMPETS. I had to confess my adventures in the kitchen. To prove my point on just how sneaky this recipes are I was mentioning your website…so I dragged him later to show him, so he could see for himself that I wasn’t covering up my misfortune and that somehow I hadn’t fouled up somewhere. Recipes are funny that way, they really push one’s confidence when things go wrong- so I feel the need to overcompensate by explain myself out of the unpainted corner. And this is because he’s used to my stuff coming out OK. So, no crumpets for breakfast. I will only dish out that which I am thrilled to eat myself.

    We went to Costco, where I bought another huge package of yeast. It’s a lot cheaper than buying the little packets at the grocery store….it just takes forever to use up. Something like 2 or 3 pounds of the stuff for $3.39? Can’t afford not to.

    When I was looking at your blog this morning I had a hearty laugh. I too have been entertaining visions of homemade lasagna in my head. When my mother in law visited last I made one for her, with the noodle from scratch and what not. In my head, it’s easier than dealing with the blasted box noodles- and much tastier, always better eaten the next day. I have my big tub of ricotta stashed in the fridge for when I am ready. My grandmother was Italian and since she raised us 3 kids we had certain traditions. Sunday was Pasta day. Take your pick, all sorts of pasta. My sister still carries that tradition, though I’ve strayed a little. but today’s menu? Pasta. My favorite is made with fresh tomatoes, though I am a little late to be growing my own this year. Last year the ideal was Basil…to make the perfect Pesto sauce, Genovese style. Sigh. Dreams of food are easy to make come true:)

    I have an ideal for crumpets and will not let up until I discover it, create it, or die. I do think it’s possible, if they can do, so can I. After all, my arm may not be that strong, but I have a standing mixer….HA!

    Will let you know when I have cracked the code.

  10. Hi, I just randomly found this blog on Google. I live in the UK and so have pretty easy access to crumpets but I’ve always wanted to try actually cooking them. I think your blog has just given me the impetus to actually do so! 🙂

    Another thing I think you should try are these things called pikelets. They’re kinda like flatter versions of crumpets but everso slightly sweeter and a bit more crispy when toasted. I used to love them as a kid but they’re pretty hard to find now.

  11. Chris, hi! Pikelets? Hm…I will have to check my cookbooks – they sound really good.

    If you do end up making crumpets some time, give me a shout – I’d love to know how they turned out!

  12. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  13. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  14. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  15. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  16. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  17. Jayne! I did it!

    I also have pictures. I will put them into a slideshow format or something like a remix from Photobucket.

    I got a hold of this recipe from an article, about the London Maids Crumpets in the West Coast. No real instructions. I have always believed that the recipe itself it half of the success, the other half is experience…or experimenting as it were:)

    I used equal amounts of water to flour! That was a surprise, but it works. I also put in the yeast with the warm water (at lower than 130F) in my stand mixer. I whipped it a little and let it rest for a bit. This was the new yeast I had bought. A bit of sugar and a little more wait time. Meantime I pulled out my cast iron big pan. I have a little issue with my biggest element, it heats up too much. It was fine with my other pan, if a little too hot for the purpose- even though it says to have a very hot pan (450F) in some recipes. I have come to believe that a medium heat is better as the bottom would otherwise brown while the rest of the crumpet is still not cooked. I arranged my oversize roast beef, cleaned out cans and off I went.

    The next step was to add the flour and the salt, I could see a bit of a foam to it. I kept in mind that the batter needed to be whipped A LOT. I started with three cups of warm water and left the last one out waiting just in case I needed it as the water amount was a guideline. I poured the flour in and started to whip until everything was coming together nicely. At some point I stopped and looked at the batter by removing the beater whisk. There was an almost slimy look to it, a very gluten-y gob was rather solid and hanging from the beater. I decided that the batter needed a bit more water, it wasn’t looking like pancake batter…where the last thing you want is gluten. I threw in the last cup. By this time the pan was ready. I also had a big lid on hand. An old trick someone had given me to help pancakes puff up before they dry out as the steam stays in for a bit.

    I whipped the water in some more, it is SO much easier with the stand mixer. You could say that it’s a heck of an ice breaker for those cliquish relationships. Last but not least I added the 2 tbsp. baking powder. I did not let the dough proof or rise in any way. I started frying the little babies right away.

    I thought about the recipe saying that they threw everything in at once, but the yeast will need time to proof and produce bubbles, whereas the Baking powder will produce bubbles as soon as it touches liquids. Beating the batter indeed deflated the bubbles created with the powder. What was a girl to do? I added a smidgen more powder, about a half teaspoon and gave it a few whips to mix it up. That did the trick. If you look at the pictures you’ll see the bubbles in my pyrex cup. It is at once proofing with the yeast AND creating bubbles from the Baking Powder. Having thinned out the batter made the creation of steam that much more efficient. I had fried the first batch and were much like the first batch, a little dense. Add more water to the full four cups and then the baking powder and you have very fluffy, moist in the inside crumpets with the vertical lines that a crumpet is supposed to have. I added no eggs to the mix. I am considering cake flour still. Next batch will have cake flour, perhaps a half/half ratio. I do think that regardless of what the box says, cake flour will be able to develop the gluten (at least some) if beaten enough. I do want my crumpets to have a lighter colour than what I am getting as well as a more defined crumb. I can’t quite put my finger on it, but I guess I want it to look more like the crumpets I buy.

    The main idea was to achieve a crumpet that looked like a crumpet, moist inside with all those bubble holes and the texture of vertical lines of cooked dough around all those lovely craters. My ultimate aim then will be to achieve larger craters, a lighter tone in colour and an even spongier texture. My guess in using half/half of flour will be that the gluten will be developed enough to give it structural strength, and that the cake flour will make it light enough that the crumpet will puff up sufficiently fast to create a larger crater.

    The last crumpets of my batch were so fluffy and large and almost perfect I could have flown around the house I was so happy about it. I would have made a total of 24, but really made 23 plus the little runt in the last frame. Next time my batter will be thinner from the get go, as I will add all four cups of water at once and get the whipping done before I add the Baking Powder. This is considering that I fried a few BEFORE adding that extra water and it was those first crumpets that are denser. With the full water amount I also noticed that it was easier to pour more batter into the rings and that they would still cook up all the way through. This game me much thicker crumpets, which were light as air and spongy.

    The pictures are indeed in chronological order, I have included all that I took and didn’t mix them up for the sake of editing. This is real life after all.

    On last bit of advice. I had a big stove element, but apparently not big enough, the middle of my pan was hotter than the outside…so I waited a solid 30 seconds, then rotated each ring 180 degrees, this helped to cook them evenly. Before each batch I put the rings back to the pan, then sprayed with Pam. They heat up quickly, so no need to wait too long.

    And that was that!

    Now I’m curious if buttermilk would make them taste better, maybe just one cup? I had no trouble not letting the dough proof. My guess is that the yeast only needs a little time to give flavour to the batter and a little bit of oomph…it’s not there to actually help the dough rise or create bubbles. Or else the old adage of beating the dough until your arm falls off would not hold true. The beating is done to incorporate air into it.

    Hee-hee…I see crumpets in my future:)

    I hope this link works:

    http://s105.photobucket.com/albums/m240/Photofiend_2006/Gorgeous%20Crumpets/?action=view&current=562dea4a.pbw

  18. LourdesB –

    Awesome, awesome job! Thanks so much for sharing it all with me – and the pictures look great!! And you’ve got me wanting to make these again, too. YAY for you!!! 🙂

  19. Thanks Jayne!

    It’s crazy how the more I make a recipe, the easier and faster I can whip it out. I really am looking forward to making these with the cake flour…but I feel a little guilty to make them before finishing what I had cooked. They are frozen now, but it’s all the same. Wouldn’t want them to go bad on me.

    Love, love, LOVE chocolate pudding. Also tapioca pudding is DH’s favorite. I wonder what would happen if I mix the two?

    Cheerios!

    Keep up the good blog!

  20. I was delighted to stumble into your website. I had been browsing thru a website by the name of http://www.vermontcountrystore.com and it showed two listings for crumpets. While I am one of the poor, unfortunate souls that live across the pond in an area that can’t even boast decent sausage rolls or fishnchips, the only thing we had similar to this lovely treat was English Muffins. I never knew there was anything else out there that could beat it out. Then I began corresponding with a gal that lives in Orpington in Kent County. She introduced me to wonderfully sinful, honest-to-goodness crumpets. We would often send each other “care packages” of our favorites. She came to visit with me and my husband back in the early 90’s and she brought several packages along with her along with some of the “normal” candy bars that British children and adults love. We didn’t know each other well enough then to have exactly what each one would be craving for. She got me hopelessly hooked on crumpets. I love them toasted well with peanut butter and jelly. There doesn’t seem to be a “proper English topping” other than just butter maybe. When I visited her in 1996, my first visit to England ever, I fell in love with sausage rolls, fishnchips and pasties. We still send each other care packages of our favorites. When she visited me, she fell in love with Hamburger Helper, Hostess Twinkies and Drakes Ding Dongs. When I went to visit her in 96, I had a whole suitcase filled with as many different boxes of Hamburger Helper (mince y’all call hamburger), Tuna Helper, Chicken Helper and Pork Helper. Plus two huge boxes of her sweet favs. In return for that haul, I got a wonderful sausage roll recipe from her mother that has been turned into an annual favorite at our family for Christmas. I make up two rolls the night before Christmas Eve and a big pot of homemade chicken noodle soup with homemade noodles. For a time, I was able to get crumpets and meat pasties at my local “gourmet” Giant supermarket but, after the early 2000’s, they quit carrying them much to my dismay and I haven’t been able to find a replacement supplier. Pasties are not something that would hold up well under shipping from that distance. I have a couple of nice additions that I added to the sausage roll recipe. I get a can of sliced potatoes and a can of sliced button mushrooms. I dice them up fine and I mix them with the sausage along with some onion and spices. I like to add some red chili powder ground from jalapenos from New Mexico to my pasties and sausage rolls. It gives them a kick almost like curry. I loved this whole site and I will have you know that I have gotten totally starved now from reading thru all the yummy looking stuff on here. You wouldn’t happen to have a good bannock recipe would you? I am a huge fan of Mists of Avalon and Marion Zimmer Bradley talks alot about bannock and honey. What is bannock. Any way ta for now!

  21. I made the second recipe and they were so good and even fun to make. I didn’t have round cookie cutters though so now I have little valentine and duck shaped ones.

    Thank you so much for this. <3

  22. I just returned from Australia and my first experience with crumpets. I thought I would like to try some and found this site on the internet. am going to have tuna so I can have “rings” and try it, THANKS.

  23. I am about to make crumpets..I am so excited love them with grated cheese on the too.mmm.

    I live in Denver and am about to start my own mobile pastie,lunch service..including scotch eggs and the odd slice of parkin..maybe I’ll get the knack of this and sell bags of crumpets …wish me luck!!

  24. I’ve just made two batches of crumpets with two different recipes myself and neither of them worked – they both looked just liek your first batch – not enough holes! I shall be tryng the second recipe here as they look fantastic.

  25. In keeping with the trend the first batch was a disappointing disaster, but the second attempt this weekend worked beautifully and were delicious! Doc used a recipe for pikelets from his bread machine book, so that he could use the machine to make the batter (he was in a very impatient mood, he almost didn’t make them at all because he didn’t want to wait for the yeast to rise). We also had bought silicone egg rings to cook them in, they are just the right size, don’t get too hot and they have a handy little handle on them too.

    I ate three hot from the griddle whilst standing up in the kitchen, I barely managed to wait long enough for a cup of tea to brew!

  26. I loved crumpets as a kid, well, the store bought ones. After all, that that is all I am familiar with. But now that I live in a far off and strange land (Illinois), and my access to crumpets is reduced, I was determined to make my own. With my first “experimental” batch I realized that this was much trickier than it looks. Either they were burnt on the bottom or not quite cooked in the inside. The only advantage I had was I knew what they were suppose to look and taste like…well, the store bought ones.

    But using your advice, I shall try again!

    PS. Your final photos looked truly wonderful.

  27. Oh I am so jealous. Here in Australia, store bought ones are readily available, but I want to make my own, minus the preservatives that the store bought ones come with. BUT, I can’t use yeast. I want a crumpet recipe without yeast, but do you think I can find one that makes real crumpets, not just pikelet-y looking things? Sigh.

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