Photography

Searching For Seals

Maybe a month ago Bill mentioned to the kids that at some point we should see if we could spot any Harbor seals on the rocks in the bay.  Around this time of year, they show up in Narragansett Bay, and you can even go on Seal Watch trips out of Newport

But we didn't want to spend money or go out on a boat.  We just thought it would be fun to pick a few likely spots and head out on our own.  So earlier this week we decided that Saturday morning would be a good time to go – nothing else was planned other than maybe some more baking – and so this morning, after I dropped a bunch of boxes of cookies off at the post office, we dressed warmly (though not warmly enough – I really need warmer gloves…and new boots) and headed for Jamestown.

We didn't see any seals, but it was fun nevertheless.  There was always the possibility that maybe we'd see some at the next stop…or the next…or the next.  I brought my camera (of course), so here's a brief glimpse of our adventure in the frigid lower bay.  We're expecting a lovely blizzard tonight, and you could just feel the coming snowstorm in the air.  Not just the cold…or the wind.  There's just a certain calm, preparing feeling in the air.  The "calm before the storm," to use the cliche.  The overcast, cold, kind of fuzzy look in the sky, and an almost yellowy-pink cast just above the horizon in some places.  I love it. 

Anyway, our first little stop – Mackerel Cove.  This is where, many years ago, my husband let his best friend talk him into doing the Penguin Plunge on January 1st.  My tall, thin, not an ounce of fat on his body husband.  He is not designed for plungeing (plunging?) with anyone, penguins or other creatures.  He looked rather shell-shocked when he emerged from his plunge, and he vowed never to do it again.  And he hasn't.  Our friend, John, however, is apparently part polar bear.  He goes back every year.

So – Mackerel Cove.  No seals today.  Or penguins.

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So back into the car and off to another spot – Hull Cove.  We had to park the car and walk along a little path before we got to the shore.  The ground was frozen, little shards of ice filled in some of the frozen footprints.  Very cold, and very cool.

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And then it was over to Beavertail, and Beavertail Light House….

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Ah well, no seals.  But it was a fun little wintery adventure nonetheless.

2 thoughts on “Searching For Seals

  1. that looks so lovely! my husband and i went to maine on our honeymoon and took a whale watching tour–i got seasick and the only sea life was when the captain yelled “harbor seal, three o’clock!!” i love the coast up north…in kentucky there are no seals 🙁

  2. Sarah, there are no seals in Texas either 🙁

    Do they not have a “Seal Watch” network? We have Whooping Crane watch here. When the Whooping Cranes and Sand Hill Cranes are coming back down from the Arctic to winter on the Texas coast, you can go to a website that will tell you where they were last seen. They are tracked from Canada to Texas and once they get here then you can go see the nesting grounds on the coast… It’s pretty controlled though, not like seeing seals on the rock where you are.

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